sacbee

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: Showing off in Sacramento-area garden tours

Seeds: Showing off in Sacramento-area garden tours


Phillips and Rix Pink China Climber is among the rare roses in Sacramento’s Historic City Cemetery.

We all know how April showers bring May flowers (and hopefully, we’ll have a few of both). But April flowers have the power to bring out something else – crowds.

April’s...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: Native lilacs in UC Davis’ New Front Yard series

Seeds: Native lilacs in UC Davis’ New Front Yard series


California native lilacs come in several colors. This is the Marie Simon ceanothus hybrid in the UC Davis Arboretum.

Ellen Zagory sees examples every day; city gardeners are embracing the concept of the “New Front Yard.”

“Reducing water use doesn’t mean brown and dry,”...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: Heirloom fruit has bonus beyond taste

Seeds: Heirloom fruit has bonus beyond taste


These heirloom pears are among the scores of varieties organic farmer Amigo Bob Cantisano is trying to reintroduce to California growers. Doyenné Robin pears trace back to 1840 and are described as “meltingly sweet and juicy.”

There’s a reason heirloom crops have lasted a hundred years or more.

...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: Spring flowers distract from drought worries

Seeds: Spring flowers distract from drought worries


Enjoying unseasonally warm weather in late February, bees buzz around a flowering pear (Pyrus calleryana) in Sacramento, above. At left, tulips bloom in Sacramento’s Fremont Community Garden.

Daffodils don’t read the weather report. Neither do tulips or lilacs or a basket full of other early spring bloomers.

...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: San Francisco Flower & Garden Show revives ‘wow factor’

Seeds: San Francisco Flower & Garden Show revives ‘wow factor’


The 2014 San Francisco Flower & Garden Show will put the emphasis on colorful (but drought-tolerant) flowers. Pictured here are purple flowering Geranium x procurrens 'Ann Folkard' with Sedum “Autumn Joy” in front of Veronicastrum virginicum “Fascination” foliage in a garden designed by Gary Ratway.

Nathan Beeck got...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: Roses prove toughness during drought

Seeds: Roses prove toughness during drought


Iceberg roses offer vigor and disease resistance without much irrigation.

Lance Walheim has heard plenty of head-scratching questions about roses. He’s not surprised. After all, he wrote the best-selling guide book “Roses for Dummies.”

“The No. 1 mistake people make with roses is improper watering,” said Walheim,...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: San Francisco Flower & Garden Show aims for the low-water mark

Seeds: San Francisco Flower & Garden Show aims for the low-water mark


Water-wise gardens will be at the forefront of the 2014 San Francisco Flower & Garden Show, set for March 19-23. This California drought-tolerant succulent garden was designed by Jeff Moore.

In time of drought, a gardener’s instinct is to pull back. Conserve. Be cautious.

Chris Woods sees...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: Solving Sacramento’s camellia mysteries

Seeds: Solving Sacramento’s camellia mysteries


Lilla Burrows, left, points out a variety of a bloom to her husband, John Burrows, at the Sacramento Camellia Show in 2011. The 90th show will be held next weekend.

Camellias aren’t just beautiful; they’re tough. Need proof? Look around Sacramento this week.

Sure, the weather...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: Home landscapes of the future – less lawn, more meadow

Seeds: Home landscapes of the future – less lawn, more meadow


This edible front yard in Palo Alto is featured in the Sunset Western Garden Book of Landscaping.

A few days of rain does not end a historic drought.

Recent storms won’t wash away California’s need or desire for low-water landscapes.

“When it...

Tags: |

The Sacramento Bee
Seeds: Camellias wear a brave face through dry spells

Seeds: Camellias wear a brave face through dry spells


Camellias that are established can survive drought conditions with very little irrigation. Avoid pruning them until conditions improve.

Subbing out lawns for drought-tolerant landscapes may be a long-term solution to coping with water shortages. But what if you want to keep what you’ve got?

Several readers...

Tags: |


Newest Partners